Banksy’s Influences – Who Inspired Banksy?

Banksy is a pseudo-name for a well-known British graffiti artist. He is believed to be born around 1974 in Yate, South Gloucestershire. He was first involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom on the late 1980s. The style of his artwork is mostly satirical piece on topics such as culture, ethnic, and politics. Technique wise, the way he combines both stencil and graffiti is very similar to a French artist Blek Le Rat. His art that appear in cities around the world was first born out of Bristol underground scene involving musicians and artists. His prints are popular with celebrity and singer Christina Aguilera and actor Brad Pitt.

When it started, Blek Le Rat took inspiration from New York’s graffiti scenes. It is from this scene that he created his own style by continuously painting stenciled rats around the streets in Paris before going nationwide to Lyon, Marseille and Toulouse.

Banksy has also recognized Blek Le Rat influences in his artwork while also being a big fan of Blek’s work. In one of his quote, Banksy said “Every time I think I’ve painted something slightly original, I find out that Blek Le Rat has done it as well, only twenty years earlier.”

On the other hand, Prou admitted that he sees Banksy as a son of his movement in addition to crediting Blanksy for raising his profile while providing him with increased publication that resulted in increased commercial success. In his interview with Sunday Times, Prou said “I consider him like my descendant. He took some ideas. But he changed them. And he took the movement to a huge level all over the world.”

What other’s do not really know is that there is another person whom inspired Banksy to first take out his stencils and spray paints in the dead of night. Known as the Godfather of Street Art, Richard Hambleton made his first mark in the 1970s painting chalk outlines with red blood across North America cities. His most famous piece, the Shadowman and Marlboro Man collections are among some of his pieces that have the clearest links to Banksy.

He was born in Vancouer, Canada in june 1954. He earned his bachelor in 1975 from Emily Carr School of Art. Recognize as the Founder and Co-Director of “Pumps” Center for Alternative Art in Vancouver. He is now working and living in New York City. Richard Hambleton is the surviving member of group who, together among Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, had a great success coming out of New York City art scene during the 1980s. A lot of his work is similar to graffiti art, however, Hambleton considered his work as public art.

He is the person who influenced Xavier Prou (Blek Le Rat). When ask, Prou said that he really like Richard Hambleton. Richard was the first artist from NYC to export his work all over the world in the 80s. His work has been so widespread in Europe it could be found in London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, and many other cities.


Hand painted signs NYC

Famous Artists Who Have Changed the World

Famous artists throughout history have contributed to the social and political landscape of different societies around the world. Some of these artists have made creations never before seen by man. Many have lead art movements that have shaped the world we live in. Here are four out of many who have changed the world through art.

Leonardo Da Vinci:

Multi-talented Italian painter of the 15th Century, Leonardo Da Vinci, was a master sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist. Apart form being an ingenious artist, Da Vinci possessed a brilliant mind which was inclined towards knowledge and understanding of everything. He is unique in the scientifically accurate sketches of objects, human body anatomy drafts, and medical and scientific designs that he also constructed with great detail, creativity and accuracy. Da Vinci’s abilities are astonishing at any age the truth is.

His two most famous paintings of the Mona Lisa and of The last Supper have stirred strong waves of controversy through the creation of the Da Vinci Code Series. They have also been parts of influencing or aiding new movements, such as occurrence of the deformation of the Mona Lisa painting by Dada, in order to create a new piece which belonged to the Dada art movement as opposed to the classical art movement.

Salvador Dali:

Spanish painter, Salvador Dali, was the leader of the surrealist art movement, with his famous painting entitled The Persistence of Memory in 1931. The painting featured an abysmal array of melting clocks, and was seen as a reflection of the internal and fearful clockworks of the male psyche. The nightmare like worlds that are created through Dali’s paintbrushes display an abstract, nonsensical, and logically confusing world, and may present the viewer with a way of developing underlying subconscious awareness, of lost feelings and fears.

Andy Warhol:

Andy Warhol is a leading figure or artist of the modern pop art movement. He is also one of the most influential and important artistic figures of the 20th century, and is generally associated with the proliferation of art imagery and mass imagery distribution. The nature of his modern art played a tremendous role in redefining the nature, social place, financial value, and general identity of what was considered to be art.

Warhol’s pop art portrait of Marilyn Monroe and Jacqueline Kennedy employ the usage of multi-images and repetition in order to reinforce the concept of mass production and eradicate class differences through the means of obliterating distinctions.

The public distribution of unique paintings onto the hands of many, through the aid of the printing press, challenged many notions about art, its right to become reproduced numerously, and its scope of existence, and influence in general.

Mark Rothko:

Rothko was a famous American painter of the 1900’s and an eager leader in the progression of the transient art movement of abstract surrealism. He created a link between the present surrealism of his time and the abstractism of the future, and is regarded as a progressive mind and artist. His paintings speak of nothing less than unchallenged originality and completion, and are widely influencing the direction of modern abstract art today.


Mural painter

Stages of Artistic Development in Preschoolers and Toddlers

Art is an important aspect of learning in early childhood education and must be carefully designed to enhance their artistic development and nurture an appreciation for beauty in their world. Art enriches the lives of all preschoolers and toddlers as it provides experiences for them in finding meaning about themselves and the world around them.

“From the moment the child discovers what it looks like and feels like to put lines down on paper, he has found something he will never lose, he has found art” – R. Kellogg 1969.

Rhoda Kellogg has studied 100,000 young children’s drawings drawn with pencil, pen, crayon or brush and this extensive study has helped significantly in our understanding of children’s artistic development. She was particularly interested in the scribbles of young children and she discovered that children progress from making scribbles to drawing pictures by using a built-in, spontaneous method of self-teaching and would continue until the children were 5 years old and only in the later stages of development that children’s artwork can be coached and guided by an adult.

Kellogg also identified various symbols that have been drawn by children across various cultures. The mandala design which is a simple circle or square divided by intersecting lines is produced by children in different parts of the world. Kellogg also discovered that preschoolers and toddlers unlike older children are not concerned about their art pieces looking nice or resembling real things but they move their hands to express a feeling that comes from within them and are delighted in the movement and scribbles they produce. With this knowledge in mind, it is important not to force them to look at physical objects and try to copy it but allow them to experiment, create in their own unique way thus providing them an opportunity to express their own ideas and feelings.

The artistic developmental stages are the scribble stage, basic form stage and the pictorial stage. Although there is a predictable pattern to their development, preschoolers and toddlers move through the levels in different ways and at their own pace. These stages can assist parents or teachers as they work with young children and provide guidelines for planning for a specific group of children.

Kellogg’s developmental stages

1. Scribble stage

These are the earliest drawings of young children. They are simple and random markings, made for the pleasure of drawing scribbles. During this stage, the young children have no concern in trying to draw to represent anything but rather are enjoying the process of making scribbles on the paper.

2. Basic form stage

Children begin to draw simple lines and shapes. Kellogg identified several universal symbols that children use around the world. These include the mandala, sun, ladders, spirals, wavy lines and rainbows. These symbols were being used to communicate and were the beginnings of writing. Children in this stage continue to draw for pleasure.

3. Pictorial stage

During this stage, children use the shapes from stage 2 to draw symbolic representations of real people and things such as houses, tress and windows. They begin to identify their drawings, tell related stories and expand their drawings to include new meanings and understanding.

Positive and appropriate nurture of preschoolers and toddlers beginning artistic efforts can provide a strong foundation for later development and enjoyment of artistic experiences.

10 Steps to Set Artistic Goals That Succeed Brilliantly

Setting the right artistic goals is more than energizing and inspirational! You step into your power when you create a crystal clear artistic intention. In fact, you start living as the artist you have always dreamed of being.

Don’t let this remain just a pleasant pipe dream. Learn right now how to set the kind of artistic goals that enable you to achieve what you truly want from life.

Create Only Goals That Empower You

It is easy to become overly caught up in fantasies. Initial brainstorming of possible outcomes can generate unrealistic plans to reach your goals. A bit of wild dreaming is expected and can actually motivate you. But if you don’t then apply a reality test to each option, you may end up disappointed, discouraged and discard your goals altogether.

Your Road to Rewarding Artistic Goals

Here are 10 success-driven steps to set winning goals:

  1. Identify Your Target Market.
  2. To thrive as an artist, you need to establish a clear mental picture of your targeted market. The goal is yours alone, so be completely frank.

  3. Create Specific Goals.
  4. A common goal is to paint and show your work more, but this is too general to be useful. Instead, define what you actually want: for example, “I want to exhibit in 6 shows and paint 2 pictures a month in 2012.” This is an achievable and measurable artistic goal.

  5. Set Short and Long-Term Milestones.
  6. Milestones serve a dual purpose. First, they motivate you with a focused target. Second, they break large overwhelming goals into smaller, manageable ones. Here’s how:

    • Picture your ideal long-term milestone. Make it vivid and let it energize you!
    • Mark this end point on a calendar.
    • Now, starting from your “due date”, work backwards. Schedule each short-term milestone that leads you to your ultimate goal.
    • Write it into your calendar.
    • Next, develop weekly goals to move you towards each short-term milestone.
    • Working backwards helps you achieve your goals by seeing the big picture first.
  7. Generate small, reachable artistic goals.
  8. These will maintain your enthusiasm and momentum.

  9. Expect setbacks.
  10. To expect that you will not experience any disappointment during your journey is simply unrealistic.

  11. Protect your focus.
  12. Determine how you will handle interruptions, unexpected events and low creativity, before they come to take a bite out of your productivity.

  13. Have confidence in your dream.
  14. Affirm that it’s OK if others lack the time or energy to encourage you. The one who needs to be fully committed to your dream is you. So go full tilt!

  15. Reevaluate your intention over time.
  16. It is okay and often necessary to periodically assess your initial goals. So conduct a review at regular, realistic intervals. Is this goal still valid?

  17. Revise your goal as needed.
  18. Rather than cling to a goal that no longer suits you or seems viable, update it so that it remains workable and compelling to you.

  19. Modify your strategy to fit changing times.
  20. Sometimes the goal works well, but you need to change your steps to achieve it. Shifts in your life situation can challenge you to become more resourceful. Welcome this as a chance to grow!

Artistic goals are yours. You can do with them as you wish. So bring to them the dedication they deserve. Then you live your life with passion, conviction and success!

3 Artistic Devices Used in Contemporary Movies and Film

Unlike written texts, movies generally employ three common types of artistic devices. These devices, although quite obvious once described, may not be immediately apparent to a young viewer. Educators can assist students in identifying these devices, defining their characteristics and understanding how they relate to the movie or film at hand. Repetition of this exercise will allow the young viewer to become proficient in quickly making the connection between the artistic devices used by the filmmakers and the movie’s underlying meaning.

The ELA curriculum of today has its roots in 17th, 18th and 19th century literature. The stories that interested the people of those times and were expressed via the written word. However, today’s youth will experience the vast majority of storytelling through screens (television, feature films, video games or the web). Thus, to stay relevant, modern educators must address stories told on screens as well as those in traditional written formats.

The three levels of artistic devices are:

1) Traditional Elements and Devices of Fiction in Novels and Short Stories

Many hours of current ELA instruction are spent on the elements and devices of fiction. They include: plot, character development, protagonist, antagonist, prologue, expository phase, crisis, rising action, falling action, denouement, epilogue voice, symbol, foreshadowing, flashback, imagery, irony, foil, archetype, motif, etc. These are also found in screenplays and the analysis of these elements and devices in the medium of film can assist students in understanding their use in written texts.

2) Traditional Devices of the Stage

These include: sets, simple lighting, costumes, props, sound effects, acting choice, choreography of movement, music and dance. The response to music and dance is something many young viewers are accustomed to already, as they are a crucial component of many popular movie and film productions.

3) Cinematic Methods

This layer of artistic expression includes shot angle, camera movement within the shot, music/sound effects, editing, colors/visuals and lighting levels.

In conclusion, no single method of adapting ELA curriculum to the current digital environment has been agreed upon. Many discussions and varying methods exist. However, regardless of the method, students will ultimately benefit from having the tools to make sense of what they see on the screen. The important aspect to take away from this writing is that every ELA course (from 6th to 12th grade) should devote a substantial portion of their lessons to analyzing stories through movies and documentary film.


Wall Mural Painter